Shady Trail

Decent tree cover for most of the trail
KX7L's picture

A pleasant end to a late summer

Summit: 
W7W/SN-074

When I heard that the long-standing dry and sunny weather we'd been having for weeks was about to end on Friday, I cleared a day off work on Thursday and determined to take another stab at Mt McCausland.  The drive to the trailhead is pretty straightforward.

K7ATN's picture

Augspurger Mountain, WA | Apr-2012

Summit: 
W7W/LC-097

The trail was difficult at this time of year with significant blowdown from an ice storm in February. I actually turned back twice but then decided to give it one more try. (Well, two more.) The attached photo shows the obliterated trail - the blowdown went on for almost a mile. I also hit continuous snow at 2200 feet (Augspurger tops out near 3700). I eventually lost the trail again in the snow kicking steps and then was postholing for about an hour.

K7ATN's picture

Larch Mountain, OR | Feb-2012

Summit: 
W7O/WV-062

Let's start by making sure we are talking about Oregon's Larch Mountain and not one of the two Larch Mountains in Washington, and not the one in Idaho either.

K7ATN's picture

Dog Mountain, WA | March-2012

Summit: 
W7W/LC-119

Dog Mountain is a wonderful climb nine months of the year - but in March we went from spotty sun and 38F to snow blowing sideways at 25 mph and perhaps 27F in a partial white out. It's a bit less than eight miles round trip with 2900 feet of gain.

K7ATN's picture

North Paulina Peak, OR | Sep-2012

Summit: 
W7O/CE-014

This would be a great activation on a mountain bike - the single track looks like a good time. On busy weekends hikers might be outnumbered by bikes - however, for this early fall, late evening activation I saw no one on the trail. The trail is about 4.1 miles one way with about 3/10 miles of that cross country and 1300 feet of elevation gain.

K7ATN's picture

Buck Peak, OR | Sep-2012

Summit: 
W7O/CN-046

Sixteen miles of roundtrip hiking, even on a nice trail, is a long way to go for two points, but it might the easiest way to get to Buck Peak and it's a lovely hike just the same.

K7ATN's picture

Peak 3977, WA ("Starway") | Sep-2012

Summit: 
W7W/LC-085

The trail is called the "Starway Trail" but it could be better named the "Stairway Trail" as it is one of the steepest trails I have ever hiked - but the views from the top are worth it. And then, the peak should also have the SOTA vanity name, "Starway." The elevation gain is in the order of 2400 feet in just over two miles and pretty much relentlessly climbs for the first half of the hike. Note that this peak can also be approached from Silver Star (from the south) with less elevation gain, although the trail is a bit faint in places.

KK7DS's picture

High Rock, WA

Summit: 
W7W/PL-029

On September 1st, Taylor and I returned to the site of our first "real" SOTA activation almost a year later. Before climbing High Rock in late September 2011, my SOTA activities had been confined to one and two point locations where one had to make an effort to travel far enough from the vehicle to satisfy the spirit of the game. Until this fourth summit came along, I was able to carry way too much stuff the short distance from the vehicle to the operating location.

KK7DS's picture

Black Butte, OR

Summit: 
W7O/CM-033

Black Butte is one of those mountains that is very recognizable and easy to spot on the horizon. Not because it has any disctinctive features, but rather because it has none. It looms darkly over the desert of central oregon as a perfect cone, easily distinguished from its sharp and craggy neighbors like Mt. JeffersonMt.

K7ATN's picture

Barlow Ridge, OR | Aug-2012

Summit: 
W7O/CN-028

Barlow Ridge is a pleasant three mile or so hike east of Mount Hood. Although relatively close to Portland the trail is seldom used, (especially past Barlow Butte) and has a nice 'wild' character about it. In other words, the trail seldom sees maintenance. It's a leg stretcher with about 1000 feet of net gain, but quite a bit more elevation change with all the ups and downs along the ridge line. Quite a bit more.