Forested Summit

Summit is forested and/or has ample tree cover.
kf7hiz's picture

1460, Oregon | August 2019

Summit: 
W7O/NC-121

K7FOP and I joked that this summit report could be summed up in two words: “NOT RECOMMENDED”. But I’ll go into more detail if you’re up for an adventure with your GPS and machete in hand. It’s a heck of a bushwhack for just one point. For a much easier drive up point, try Little Hebo North of Hwy 22.

K7ATN's picture

Browns Mountain, OR | August 2019

Summit: 
W7O/CM-085

Browns Mountain, west of Sunriver, despite being pretty close to a paved road, was a tough bushwack for Roland-K7FOP and I, as we pursued several "shortcuts." So we recommend walking about 2.4 miles on forest roads, and a final steep ascent of about 1/10 mile. Total is about 900 feet of gain. If there's a better way to get to the AZ, please write up an updated trip report. 

KI7EMX's picture

Bishop Mountain Idaho

Summit: 
W7I/ER-079

Bishop Mountain is an extinct volcanic vent on the rim of the Island Park Caldera. At the summit there is a fire lookout that is one of the few remaining towers in the Targhee National Forest. The 72-ft tower was constructed in 1937. Now on standby status, the tower saw extensive service during the Yellowstone Fires of 1988. The summit also has a couple of picnic tables, a cabin that is available for rent through the Forest Service and a fire pit.

K7ATN's picture

Ochoco Mountains HP, OR | July 2019

Summit: 
W7O/CE-080

Ochocco Mountains High Point could be considered a drive-up summit...for some vehicles. Although most of the way is paved, your low clearance passenger vehicle will have problems with the road in places where you can't turn around. A quarter mile of walking to the summit is recommended - it's a neat spot.

About 30 miles east of Prineville on Highway 26, turn north on Forest Road 27. This may be described as Grant Springs Road, or Summit Road, depending on your resource. This is near milepost 49. 

N7KRN's picture

Chase Mountain

Summit: 
W7W/WE-007

Chase Mountain is in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington near the town of Dayton. There is no trail to the summit, but you can drive right into the activation zone. Park at the bottom of forest service road 6437 for a 2.2 mile walk or drive up to the top and walk out and back in as I did. There are a few places at the top to pull your vehicle off the road.

W6PZA's picture

Little Tamarack... nice activation destination with rental cabin

Summit: 
W7O/NE-137

Little Tamarack Mountain (W7O/NE-137) makes a nice activation destination in north-central Oregon as it's located in the Umatilla NF near a Forest Service rental cabin/lookout with two other summits nearby, including Ng Knob-4820 (W7O/NE-147) and Happy Jack Ridge (W7O/NE-139).  I rented the cabin for two nights.  Activated Little Tamarack on the first day, then bagged the other two summits the next. 

K7ATN's picture

N.D. des Anges, FR | May 2019

Summit: 
F/CR-334

 One of our favorite summits in France, you can visit the winery and then hike up the road to the chapel and play radio! You can even stay overnight in accommodations at the winery. The hike is all of 1km with about 90m of rise. At the chapel there's a bench and some shade - a perfect spot to activate after wine!

It's perhaps easiest to find the summit by finding the winery: Chemin Notre Dame des Anges, 84570 Mormoiron. That's about an hour east of Avigion.

K7ATN's picture

Grivets, FR | May 2019

Summit: 
F/AB-508

Grivets is a simple "SOTA-car" (drive-up) summit about 30km south of Grenoble, France. There's nothing remarkable about this one-pointer, but it could be a quick activation stop along the A51.

K7ATN's picture

Le Pet du Loup, FR | May 2019

Summit: 
F/MC-256

Le Pet du Loup is a simple and easy summit in the lovely Parc Naturel du Pilat, about 45 minutes south of Lyon, France. Google Translate might let you know that "Le Pet du Loup" really does mean the Fart of the Wolf - a fun name.

K7AHR's picture

Trying to get up Prospect Ridge, 2019/05/27

Summit: 
W7W/SO-036

After studying the map, I thought it was worth checking if the road that approaches the summit is accessible. I invited my family, and we drove up to check, and it definitely is not. We drove NF 23 to NF 2353, which proceeds past some campsites to the trailhead. There is a gate that is sometimes closed, but this doesn't really add a lot of effort to the trail. We got to NF2348, which turns into NF2365 and heads up the mountain, to find a berm had been constructed, decidedly closing the road. We made the decision to hike it anyway, and embarked.